Fall 2021 Courses

Below are required courses and possible elective courses for SLA majors and will take place in Fall 2021 unless otherwise indicated. Courses marked with an asterisk (*) can typically count towards the SLA minor. However, all students, majors and minors, should check with their advisor on course selections. Please also consult Course Search & Enroll for courses listed in the SLA Student Handbook, but not listed below.

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Curriculum & Instruction 719: Introduction To Qualitative Research

Information from this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

Instructor:  Emily Machado and Leema Berland

Day(s) and Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1:00 – 2:15 pm

Modality: In-person

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Description: Provides an overview of qualitative inquiry, examining assumptions, standards, and methods for generating and communicating interpretations. Methodological and theoretical works illustrate case study, ethnography, narrative, and action research. Does not include a field method component.

Curriculum & Instruction 736: Educating Linguistically and Culturally Diverse Learners

Instructor: Maggie Hawkins

Day(s) and Time: Tuesdays, 10:15 am – 12:45 pm

Modality: In-person

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Description: This course addresses issues related to schooling for linguistically and culturally diverse students, emphasizing sociocultural approaches to language acquisition, use and development and to learning.  From a sociocultural perspective, languages, literacies and cultures are fully intertwined with schooling, and with the lives and identities of students and families, and can only be understood in relation to the larger contexts of the spaces and places within which they are situated.  We explore the multiple facets of ecologies of schooling for multilingual learners, including: theories relating to languaging, literacies, learning, globalization and mobility; programming, policies and curriculum; school and classroom environments; and connections between families, communities and schools.

Curriculum & Instruction 916: Post-modern Methods

Please check with your advisor to be sure this topic is appropriate.  Information from this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

Instructor: Thomas Popkewitz

Day(s) and Time: Mondays, 8:30  – 11:00 am

Modality: In-person

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Description: [none provided]

Curriculum & Instruction 975: Coloniality of Language/Race & Culture

Please check with your advisor to be sure this topic is appropriate.

Instructor: Diego Roman and Katie Kirchgasler

Day(s) and Time: Wednesdays, 9:00 – 11:30 am

Modality: In-person

Prerequisite: None

Description: This seminar examines ongoing histories of the coloniality of curriculum by interweaving analytical insights from postcolonial studies, postfoundational science studies, and raciolinguistic ideologies. These literatures provide new leverage to contest racial and linguistic power formations, question universalized hierarchies of knowing, languaging, and being, and historically examine productions of Self and Other in educational research, policy, and classroom practice.

Curriculum & Instruction 975: Conceptual Writing Ed Research

Please check with your advisor to be sure this topic is appropriate.  Information from this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

Instructor: John Rudolph

Day(s) and Time: Thursdays, 10:15 – 12:45 pm

Modality: In-person

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Description: [none provided]

Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis 940: Leadership for Higher Education in a Global Context

This course is not on the electives list. Please talk to your advisor before enrolling.

Instructor: Weijia Li

Day(s) and Time: Wednesdays, 4:40 – 7:10 pm

Modality: In-person

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Description: This graduate course offers a close look at contemporary issues pertaining to the impact of globalization on higher education and on the leadership for higher education in a global context. Course participants will engage in focused discussions and inquiries in regard to institutional policies, programs, and practices of domestic and foreign universities in light of the global trends, opportunities, and challenges facing the internationalization of higher Education. Delving into the latest discussion and debates on this subject from both researchers’ and practitioners’ points of view, this course will primarily serve as a venue for course participants to develop knowledge and expertise in developing and implementing policies, programs, and strategies for the internationalization of higher education. Graduate students from all fields, especially in Education, International Studies, Foreign Languages, Public Affairs, and Communications are welcome to enroll.

Key topics: Leadership and administration in higher education, Internationalization of higher education, global student mobility, international branch campus, world university ranking, internationalizing curriculum, internationalizing teaching and learning, internationalizing campus, international collaboration and partnership in education, assessment of global competence

English 314: Structure of English

Information from this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

Instructor:  Juliet Huynh

Day(s) and Time: Mondays, Wednesday, and Fridays, 9:55-10:45  am

Modality: In-person

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

Description: Linguistic methods of analysis and description of English syntax and morphology

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English 315: English Phonology

Information from this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

Instructor: Tom Purnell

Day(s) and Time: Mondays, Wednesday, and Fridays, 1:20 -2:10 pm

Modality: In-person

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

Description: Basic principles of phonetics and phonology applied to the description of English

English 316: English Language Variation In The U.S.

Information from this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

Instructor: Tom Purnell

Day(s) and Time: Mondays, Wednesday, and Fridays, 11:00 am – 11:50 am

Modality: In-person

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

Description: Description and analysis of geographical and social variation in English in the United States.

*English 318: Second Language Acquisition

Instructor: Juliet Huynh

Day(s) and Time: Mondays and Wednesdays, 2:30-3:45 pm

Modality: In-person

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

Description: This course will introduce the field of second language acquisition. The course will cover research topics including the differences between first and second language acquisition, language perception and production and how the first and second language are affected, and what the second language teaching implications are.

English 415: Introduction to TESOL Methods

Information from this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

Instructor: Joe Nosek

Day(s) and Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1:00-2:15 pm

Modality: In-person

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

Description: Teaching of English to speakers of other languages. Exploration of the contexts in which English is taught, and methods and materials used to teach it.

*English 420: Topics in ELL: Third Language Acquisition

Instructor: Jacee Cho

Day(s) and Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 2:30-3:45 pm

Modality: In-person

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

Description: This course provides an introduction to third language (L3) acquisition within the generative theory. Questions we will address in this course include: (1) What is special about L3 acquisition? (3) What is the initial stage of L3 acquisition (native language (L1), second language (L2), or both?) (3) What motivates linguistic transfer selectivity between the two available systems (i.e., L1 and L2).

*There is no required textbook. All reading materials will be available electronically on the course website.

English 515: Techniques And Materials For TESOL

Information from this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

Instructor: [none listed]

Day(s) and Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9:30 – 10:45 am

Modality: In-person

Prerequisite: English 415

Description: Supervised practice in the use of current techniques and materials in the teaching of English to speakers of other languages, including peer and community teaching with videotaped sessions.

English 700: Introduction To Composition Studies

Information from this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

Instructor: Morris Young

Day(s) and Time: Fridays, 10:00 am – 12:30 pm

Modality: In-person

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Description: Rhetorical, linguistic, psychological, and social foundations of writing; implications for instruction.

*English 711: Research Methods in English Applied Linguistics

Instructor: Jacee Cho

Day(s) and Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11:00 -12:15 pm

Modality: In-person

Description:  This course provides an introduction to quantitative, qualitative, and mixed research methods in applied linguistics. The main goals of the course are (1) to develop knowledge about fundamentals of research design and quantitative & qualitative research methods and (2) to design your own research study.

To address the first goal, we will read book chapters on linguistic research methodology. We will also read and critically evaluate papers reporting studies that used methods covered in this course. To address the second goal, we will learn to identify a research problem, formulate a research question, choose the type of research method appropriate for the research question, and develop research instruments. You will write a research proposal by Week 11 and will present your project in Weeks 14-15. We will also learn and practice writing a research report throughout the semester.

There is no required textbook. All reading materials will be available electronically on the course website.

French 820 / Italian 821: College Teaching of French/Italian

Instructor: Heather Allen

Day(s) and Time: Fridays, 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

Modality: In-person

Description: Intended for instructors of elementary- and intermediate-level collegiate French/Italian courses, the goal of FRE 820 / ITA 821 is to help you understand key concepts of communicative, literacy-oriented language teaching and related techniques for classroom instruction of French/Italian. Course objectives include the following: understanding key concepts of communicative, literacy-oriented language teaching; understanding classroom techniques for communicative, literacy-oriented language teaching; applying key concepts related to communicative, literacy-oriented language teaching to designing instructional materials, lessons, and assessment tools; and increasing engagement in pedagogical discourse on collegiate language teaching and learning.

NOTE: This course is taught in English and pedagogical strategies emphasized apply to a wide range of language-teaching contexts. Due to space limitations, this course is open for regular enrollment by graduate students and official audits but no unofficial “sitting in” is possible.

Linguistics 522: Advanced Morphology

Information from this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

Instructor: Ryan Henke

Day(s) and Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9:30 – 10:45 am

Modality: In-person

Prerequisite: LINGUIS 322

Description: Advanced morphological theory.

Philosophy 516: Language and Meaning

Information from this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

Instructor: John Mackay

Day(s) and Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9:30 – 10:45 am

Modality: In-person

Prerequisite: Junior standing and completion of 3 credits in PHILOS

Description: The nature and function of language, theories of meaning, semantic and syntactic paradoxes, proper names, private languages, rules, and linguistic relativity.

Psychology 414: Cognitive Psychology

Information from this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

Instructor:  Brad Postle

Day(s) and Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9:30 – 10:45 am

Modality: In-person

Prerequisite: PSYCH 202, (BIOLOGY/ZOOLOGY 101 and 102), BIOLOGY/BOTANY/ZOOLOGY 151, or (BIOCORE 381 and 382)

Description: How people perceive, learn, remember, plan, solve problems, make decisions, and communicate. The main approach is psychological but will also consider contributions from computer science, linguistics, and neurobiology.

Psychology 521: The Structure Of Human Thought: Concepts, Language And Culture

This course is not on the electives list. Please talk to your advisor before enrolling.

Instructor:  Gary Lupyan

Day(s) and Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm

Modality: In-person

Description: This class will take you on an intellectual tour of how humans conceptualize the world, focusing on the role of language. We will begin by discussing the evolution of language and how it relates to other communication systems used by humans and nonhuman animals. We will then discuss the relationship between language, culture, and cognition in varied domains from mathematics to visual perception and memory. In the process, we will tackle questions such as: What is the role of language in making us human? Do languages adapt to the environments in which they are used? Can we create new languages to improve human thought? We will also address such issues as metaphors in political discourse and propaganda, and the role of information technologies in the spread of ideas. This class will draw heavily on empirical research in cognitive and developmental psychology, and cognitive neuroscience.

Slavic 802: The Structure of Russian

Information from this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

Instructor: David Danaher

Day(s) and Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1:20 – 2:10 pm

Modality: In-person

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Description: This course provides advanced students with a theoretical and practical introduction to the linguistic structure of Contemporary Standard Russian.