Fall 2024 Courses

Below are courses that SLA majors and/or minors might – with their advisor’s consent – consider registering for in Fall 2024. Courses marked with an asterisk (*) are taught by core SLA faculty. Courses marked with an ampersand (&) can typically count towards the SLA minor. Courses are for 3 credits unless otherwise noted.

All students should consult with their advisor, i.e., the academic advisor/s for SLA majors and with Prof. Naomi Geyer (nfgeyer@wisc.edu) for minors, on course selections.

Please also consult Course Search & Enroll for additional information or courses not listed below.  If you find a course that you think should be on this list, please let us know!

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& African 703: Communicative Lesson Planning (1 cr.)

This course is not on the electives list. Please talk to your advisor before enrolling. Information for this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

Instructor: Adeola Agoke

Day(s) and time: Fridays, 1:30-3:00 pm

Modality: In person

Prerequisites: Graduate/professional standing

Description: Theories and teaching methodologies for second language acquisition plus practical classroom techniques for teaching and directing programs in African languages.

*Asian 435: Teaching of Japanese

Information for this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

Instructor: Naomi Geyer

Day(s) and time: Mondays and Wednesdays 4:00 – 5:15 pm

Modality: In person

Prerequisites: ASIALANG 204 (or E ASIAN 204 prior to Summer 2019), placement into ASIALANG 303, or graduate/professional standing

Description: Methods of language teaching in general and Japanese language teaching in particular; with emphasis on special problems in teaching Japanese in the US context.

*& Asian 633: Chinese Applied Linguistics

This course is not on the electives list. Please talk to your advisor before enrolling. Information for this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

Instructor: Weihua Zhu

Day(s) and time: Tuesdays, 4:00-6:30 pm

Modality: In person

Prerequisites: Junior standing

Description: This course covers some subfields of applied linguistics such as sociolinguistics, language assessment, second language acquisition, language in interaction, forensic linguistics, language in media, language and politics, etc. Knowledge about the Chinese language is not required.

Communication Arts 402: Psychology of Communication

Information for this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

This course does not count towards a 50% graduate credit.

Instructor: Zhongdang Pan

Day(s) and time: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm

Modality: In person

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing

Description: The role and function of information processing in human communication behavior.

Questions regarding enrollment in Com Arts courses may be sent to:

registration@commarts.wisc.edu.

If you receive an error message when enrolling, first check to see if the course is initially reserved for majors or majors/certificate students. Students must enroll for sections they can attend. Com Arts does not maintain wait lists during enrollment.

Communication Arts 760: Advances in Communication Theories

This course is not on the electives list. Please talk to your advisor before enrolling. Information for this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

Instructor: Lyn Van Swol

Day(s) and time: Fridays, 10 am – 12:30 pm

Modality: In person

Prerequisites: Graduate/professional standing

Description: In-depth review and evaluation of behavioral and social scientific theories of human communication.

& Curriculum and Instruction 673: Learning Second Language and Literacies (1-6 credits)

Information for this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

Instructor: TBA

Day(s) and time: Tuesdays,  4:40 pm – 7:15 pm Oct 28 – Dec 22 (IHH)

Modality: In person

Prerequisites: Graduate/professional standing

Description: Explores theoretical and practical aspects of second language and literacy development in schooling for English learners. Includes a fieldwork component. Informed by theories, students conduct and analyze data from classroom-based research, investigating implications for learning and teaching.

*& Curriculum and Instruction 675: Lit. in Young Learners (1-3 credits)

Information for this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

Instructor: Emily Machado

Day(s) and time: Mondays, 1:45-4:15 pm

Modality: In person

Prerequisites: Graduate/Professional standing

Description: Subjects of current interest. Recent topics have included educational linguistics, language awareness, understanding language, foundations in teaching English or social studies.

Curriculum and Instruction 719: Introduction to Qualitative Research

Information for this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

Instructors: Leema Berland

Day(s) and Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1:45 – 3:00 pm

Modality: In person

Prerequisite: Graduate/professional standing

Cross listed: RP & SE 719, COUN PSY 719, CURRIC 719, ELPA 719, ED POL 719, ED PSYCH 719

Description: Provides an overview of qualitative inquiry, examining assumptions, standards, and methods for generating and communicating interpretations. Methodological and theoretical works illustrate case study, ethnography, narrative, and action research. Does not include a field method component.

*Curriculum and Instruction 723: Life History: Theories & Methods

This course is not on the electives list. Please talk to your advisor before enrolling.

Instructors: Kate Vieira

Day(s) and Time: Wednesdays, 1:45 – 4:15 pm

Modality: In person

Prerequisite: Graduate/professional standing

Description: This course addresses three central questions in life history literacy methodologies:

How do writing studies researchers write about others?
How do they write about themselves?
And to what scholarly and/or artistic ends?

This class in life history methodologies considers the dynamic relationship between craft and knowledge creation in writing studies research that involves human beings (even when the human being involved is primarily oneself).

More specifically, we will consider the history of ethnographic and sociologic methods in literacy studies, as well as writing studies’ early impulse toward both the personal essay and the inclusion of self in literacy ethnographies about others.

While standard social scientific format for qualitative research will be discussed, it will not be our focus. Rather, the objective of this class is for students to come away with their own rationales for the type of life history methodology they may choose to use in their own research—as well as some of their own “life history methods” writing that will ideally contribute to their thesis or dissertation projects.

Curriculum and Instruction 823: Coloniality of Language and Science in Education

This course is not on the electives list. Please talk to your advisor before enrolling. Information for this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

Instructors: Dr. Katie Kirchgasler

Day(s) and Time: Wednesdays 11 am – 1:30 pm

Modality: In person

Prerequisite: Graduate/professional standing

Description: This graduate seminar explores interdisciplinary theories on coloniality used in education research, with a focus on historicizing and interrogating hierarchies of language, race, and scientific reason. Examines distinct analytics of power offered by raciolinguistic perspectives, postcolonial science studies, and postfoundational curriculum studies.

Educational Policy Studies 595: Language Politics and Education

This course is not on the electives list. Please talk to your advisor before enrolling. Information for this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

Instructor: TBD

Day(s) and time: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 4:00-5:15 pm

Modality: In person

Prerequisites: Junior standing

Description: Overview of language politics, policies, and practices in global perspective; draws on the work of anthropologists, sociolinguists, and language policy scholars to examine how language choices in and regarding schooling interact with ethnic and linguistic diversity. Consider the following questions: How and under what conditions do language policies, practices, and pedagogies redress or exacerbate inequalities? How people at the local level, including educators, negotiate language and literacy policies and politics. Uses a global lens to expand local understandings and practices.

Educational Psychology 760: Statistical Methods Applied to Education I

Information for this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

Instructor: Check Course Search and Enroll

Day(s) and Time:  Multiple sections, offered, all with labs. Please check Course Search and Enroll.

Modality: In person

Prerequisite: Graduate/professional standing

Description: Introductory descriptive statistics and statistical inference; measures of central tendency and variability, confidence intervals, theory of hypothesis testing, correlation techniques.

Educational Psychology 822: Introduction to Quantitative Inquiry in Education

This course is not on the electives list. Please talk to your advisor before enrolling. Information for this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

Instructor: Christopher Saldana

Day(s) and Time:  Thursdays 4:40 – 7:10 pm

Modality: In person

Prerequisite: Graduate/professional standing

Description: Utilize the concepts and methods of quantitative social science research to conduct research on education issues. Topics include hypothesis testing, statistical inference, point estimates, graphic and numerical data displays, correlation and regression.

English 314: Structure of English

Information for this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

Instructor: Anja Wanner

Day(s) and Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9:30 – 10:45 am

Modality: In person

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

Description: Linguistic methods of analysis and description of English syntax and morphology.

English 315: English Phonology

Information for this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll. It does NOT count towards the 50% graduate coursework requirement.

Instructor: Eric Raimy

Day(s) and Time: Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 11:00-11:50 am

Modality: In person

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

Description: Basic principles of phonetics and phonology applied to the description of English.

English 316: English Language Variation in the United States

Information for this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

Instructor: Juliet Huynh

Day(s) and Time: Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 9:55 – 10:45 am

Modality: In person

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

Description: Description and analysis of geographical and social variation in English in the United States.

& English 318: Second Language Acquisition

Information for this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

Instructor: Juliet Huynh

Day(s) and Time: Mondays and Wednesdays, 2:30 – 3:45 pm

Modality: In person

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

Description: Systematic study of how people learn ESL and other second languages. An interdisciplinary survey emphasizing research in linguistics, psychology, education, and sociology into the phenomenon of second language acquisition.

English 413: English Words: Grammar, Culture, Mind

This course is not on the electives list. Please talk to your advisor before enrolling. Information for this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

Instructor: Anja Wanner

Day(s) and Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1:00 – 2:15 pm

Modality: In person

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

Description: Explores the relationship between descriptive and prescriptive grammar. Words and rules of combination (grammar) are the two basic building blocks of language. Looks at English words from different linguistic perspectives: As objects of grammar, words follow certain rules of combination (you wouldn’t say “these dog ), but they also have internal structure. For example, a word like “hopefulness is fine, while “hopenessful” does not exist. From a psycholinguistic perspective examine how children learn these formal properties as well as the meaning of words. Study how words are stored in the mind and what one can learn from situations in which one cannot access the mental dictionary properly (for example, when one feels a word is on “the tip of one’s tongue ). From a sociolinguistic perspective, look at historical and current influences on English vocabulary, including the role of dictionaries and spelling as a source of standardization. Does not require previous knowledge of linguistics.

English 415: Introduction to TESOL Methods

Information for this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll. It does NOT count towards the 50% graduate coursework requirement.

Instructor: Joseph Nosek

Day(s) and Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1:00 – 2:15 pm

Modality: In person

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

Description: Teaching of English to speakers of other languages. Exploration of the contexts in which English is taught, and methods and materials used to teach it.

*& English 420: Third Language (L3) Acquisition

Instructor: Jacee Cho

Day(s) and Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm

Modality: In person

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

Description:

Until recently, third or more (L3/Ln) acquisition was studied primarily as an extension of second language (L2) acquisition. However, recent research on bi/multilingualism has shown that there are differences in the language acquisition process and also in language use between L2 speakers and L3/Ln speakers. In this course, we will discuss some of the current theories of L3 acquisition from generative linguistic and psycholinguistic perspectives by focusing on issues related to multilingual transfer in morphosyntax and semantics.

There is no required textbook. All reading materials will be available electronically on the course website.

English 515: Techniques and Materials for TESOL

Information for this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll. It does NOT count towards the 50% graduate coursework requirement.

Instructor: Andrea Poulos

Day(s) and Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9:30-10:45 am

Modality: In person

Prerequisite: English 415

Description: Supervised practice in the use of current techniques and materials in the teaching of English to speakers of other languages, including peer and community teaching with videotaped sessions.

English 706: Special Topics in Composition Theory - Writing Affect

This course is not on the electives list. Please talk to your advisor before enrolling. Information for this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

Instructor: Eileen Lagman

Day(s) and Time: Wednesdays, 10:00 am – 12:30 pm

Modality: In person

Prerequisite: Graduate/professional standing

Description: In-depth treatment of specific problems, questions, themes, authors, texts, or historical periods in composition and rhetoric. Subject will differ each year.

*& English 711: Research Methods in Applied English Linguistics

Instructor: Jacee Cho

Day(s) and Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 2:30 – 3:45 pm

Modality: In person

Prerequisite: Graduate/professional standing

Description: This course provides an introduction to quantitative, qualitative, and mixed research methods in applied linguistics. The main goals of the course are (1) to develop knowledge about fundamentals of research design and quantitative & qualitative research methods and (2) to design your own research study.

To address the first goal, we will read book chapters on linguistic research methodology. We will also read and critically evaluate papers reporting studies that used methods covered in this course. To address the second goal, we will learn to identify a research problem, formulate a research question, choose the type of research method appropriate for the research question, and develop research instruments. You will write a research proposal by Week 11 and will present your project in Weeks 14-15. We will also learn and practice writing a research report throughout the semester.

There is no required textbook. All reading materials will be available electronically on the course website.

& English 905: Global Englishes

Information for this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

Instructor: Tom Purnell

Day(s) and Time: Mondays, 2:30 – 5:00 pm

Modality: In person

Prerequisite: Graduate/professional standing

Description: Study of a topic in applied English linguistics.

French (French and Italian) 820: College Teaching of French

Information for this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

Instructor: Loren Eadie

Day(s) and time: Fridays, 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

Modality: In person

Prerequisite: Graduate/professional standing

Description: Introduction to teaching collegiate world languages with an emphasis on communicative and literacy-based pedagogical strategies.

German 722: Theory of Teaching German (2 credits)

Information for this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

Instructor: Jeanne Schueller

Day(s) and time: Mondays and Wednesdays, 11:00 – 11:50 am

Modality: In person

Prerequisite: Graduate/professional standing

Description: Theory and methodology of teaching German as a second language.

German 758: German Syntax

Information for this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

Instructor: Mark Louden

Day(s) and Time: Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 1:20 – 2:10 pm

Modality: In person

Prerequisite: Graduate/professional standing

Description: Topics in contemporary German culture, literature, and linguistics.

Italian 340: Structures of Italian

Information for this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

Instructor: Loren Eadie

Day(s) and Time: Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays 12:05 – 12:55 pm

Modality: In person

Prerequisites: Italian 202, 204, or graduate/professional standing

Course Description: Examination of Italian phonetics and phonology, morphology and word formation, and syntax, with attention to contrasts with English. Prepares for advanced courses in Italian linguistics.

Journalism and Mass Communication 622: The Impact of Emerging Media

This course is not on the electives list. Please talk to your advisor before enrolling. Information for this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

Instructor: Katheryn Christy

Day(s) and Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9:30 am – 10:45 pm

Modality: In person

Prerequisite: Junior standing

Description: Provides an introduction to the literature and research on emerging communication technologies (e.g., blogs, social media, massively multiplayer games, mobile devices) and the effects of these technologies on the individual and societal levels. Illuminates the psychological, social, political, industrial, and policy implications of the use of emerging communication technologies. Become equipped with a basic social and scientific understanding of the interplay between technology, individuals, and society, and recurring issues concerning the adoption and usage of new communication technologies. Emphasizes empirical approaches to understanding these relationships, delving into contexts such as journalism, strategic communication, and the place of digital media in politics and society.

Linguistics 522: Advanced Morphology

Information for this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

Instructor:  Ryan Henke

Day(s) and Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11:00 am – 12:15 pm

Modality: In person

Prerequisite: Linguistics 322

Description: Advanced morphological theory.

Philosophy 516: Language and Meaning

Information for this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll. It does NOT count towards the 50% graduate coursework requirement.

Instructor: John Mackay

Day(s) and Time: Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 1:20 – 2:10 pm

Modality: In person

Prerequisite: Junior standing or 3 credits in Philosophy

Description: The nature and function of language, theories of meaning, semantic and syntactic paradoxes, proper names, private languages, rules, and linguistic relativity.

Philosophy 545: Philosophical Conceptions of Teaching and Learning

Information for this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll.

Instructor: TBA

Day(s) and Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9:30 – 10:45 am

Modality: In person

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

Description: Examination and analysis of conceptions of teaching and learning in classical philosophical works and in contemporary literature in the philosophy of education.

Psychology 414: Cognitive Psychology (3-4 credits)

Information for this class taken directly from Course Search and Enroll. It does NOT count towards the 50% graduate coursework requirement.

Instructor: Joe Austerweil

Day(s) and Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays 9:30 – 10:45 am

Modality: In person

Prerequisites: PSYCH 202, (BIOLOGY/ZOOLOGY 101 and 102), BIOLOGY/BOTANY/ZOOLOGY 151, or (BIOCORE 381 and 382)

Description: How people perceive, learn, remember, plan, solve problems, make decisions, and communicate. The main approach is psychological but will also consider contributions from computer science, linguistics, and neurobiology.

& Spanish (Spanish and Portuguese) 630: Heritage Spanish Phonetics and Phonology

Instructor: Rajiv Rao

Day(s) and time: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9:30 – 10:45 am

Modality: In person

Prerequisites: Graduate/professional standing or consent of instructor

Description: Taught in English.

Heritage speakers are those who are exposed to a minority language at home as children but tend to be dominant in the majority language as adults, while exhibiting a large degree of variation in maintenance of various aspects of their heritage language. While Spanish is the heritage language that has received the most attention to date due to the massive population of heritage speakers of Spanish in the US, the heritage Spanish sound system remains relatively understudied, primarily because until about a decade ago, researchers assumed that heritage speakers typically have “good phonology” or a “native accent.” Within the last decade, we have seen an uptick in segmental (vowels, consonants) and suprasegmental (intonation, stress, rhythm) work on heritage Spanish, some of which has been couched in key theoretical models of speech learning, and it is precisely these bodies of work that will serve as the focus of this course. While focusing on linguistic and extralinguistic variables that contribute to the so-called “heritage accent,” we will also scrutinize differences between heritage speakers, adult immigrant bilinguals, and traditional L2 learners, as well as experimental methods in heritage language research, all while simultaneously raising key questions that will pave the path for future research in this area. The culmination of these efforts will be a final empirical research project or a project proposal.